blackfashionstars:

Yaya DaCosta

oof
haaretz:

Exclusive: Draft of Kerry’s cease-fire proposal revealed. Haaretz has obtained the document, which shows the U.S. plan would have allowed Hamas to keep its rockets while ignoring most of Israel’s security demands. Read more.


haaretz:

Exclusive: Draft of Kerry’s cease-fire proposal revealed. Haaretz has obtained the document, which shows the U.S. plan would have allowed Hamas to keep its rockets while ignoring most of Israel’s security demands. Read more.

haaretz:

Exclusive: Draft of Kerry’s cease-fire proposal revealedHaaretz has obtained the document, which shows the U.S. plan would have allowed Hamas to keep its rockets while ignoring most of Israel’s security demands. Read more.

“It took me a long time to forget, and then a long time to remember.”
“I’d just say to aspiring journalists or writers—who I meet a lot of—do it now. Don’t wait for permission to make something that’s interesting or amusing to you. Just do it now. Don’t wait. Find a story idea, start making it, give yourself a deadline, show it to people who’ll give you notes to make it better. Don’t wait till you’re older, or in some better job than you have now. Don’t wait for anything. Don’t wait till some magical story idea drops into your lap. That’s not where ideas come from. Go looking for an idea and it’ll show up. Begin now. Be a fucking soldier about it and be tough.”
— Ira Glass, LifeHacker Interview (via yeahwriters)

brooklynmutt:

fastcompany:

You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

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"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."

Read More>

I love this story. 

good:

"My country is the world, and my religion is to do good." -Thomas Paine

(via good)

parasiteprogram:

processedlives:

For Nona Faustine the restitution of her sense of wholeness as an African American woman and artist manifests in the guise of a restoration of the past, emphasis on guise.  Although we see her marching up the steps of City Hall in Manhattan with nothing on but her white Sunday shoes and a pair of shackles in her left hand…she is not really trying to restore anything. It took me a while to realize it.

Her on-going photography and installation project Reconstructions is precisely that – reconstructions that attempt to replace something that was lost in the history of Blacks in America.  This should not be confused with an attempt to relive the past through reenactment. Faustine’s images are more are like markers that indicate a place, an institution, an event or a person so that with her presence on that spot she does not merely remember them for the sake of remembering, she rewrites a new history for them. There on the steps of City Hall’s Renaissance Revival facade that abuts a slave burial ground or standing on her soap box at the intersection of Water and Wall Streets where a market once trafficked in humans, she is the fearless daughter of them all, the new Venus of Willendorf reborn to reconstruct a history, the ultimate act of fecundity.

Faustine easily acknowledges the impossibility of getting at what is essential with this task she has set for herself, because to reconstruct a history is an altogether different action than to restore one. Hers is not an attempt to historicize the present but to re-write the past. She did the research, discovered who bought and sold black slaves in colonial New York, and where, and how they were transported in and out of the city. But there is no Aushwitz or Treblinka for the victims of slavery in America despite the common knowledge that an estimated 10-12 million Africans died in the Middle Passage alone, and countless others succumbed to starvation, physical abuse and disease once on these shores. In a way the images function as memorials that she makes herself, one at a time, with her body, the naked truth of its blackness braced against a cold city, reconstructing a narrative where the enslaved has dignity and is not afraid.

(via HISTORY IS NOT THE PAST | WHAT HAPPENED WAS…)

THIS IS IMPORTANT. THIS IS ART. THIS IS IMPORTANT. THIS IS ART. 

(via euo)

pulitzercenter:

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Violet Clarke’s home sits virtually in the center of the vast Athabasca tar sands, a colossal deposit of extremely heavy crude oil in the western Canadian province of Alberta.

She vaguely recalls seeing the gooey black stuff, which seeped naturally from the banks of the Athabasca River,…