Oh my god.
euo:

The Aviator (2004) dir. Martin Scorsese euo:

The Aviator (2004) dir. Martin Scorsese euo:

The Aviator (2004) dir. Martin Scorsese

euo:

The Aviator (2004) dir. Martin Scorsese

The secret of theory is that truth doesn’t exist. You can’t confront it in any way. The only thing you can do is play with some kind of provocative logic. Truth constitutes a space that can no longer be occupied. The whole strategy is, indeed, not to occupy it, but to work around it so that others come to occupy it. It means creating a void so that others will fall into it.

Jean Baudrillard, Forget Baudrillard (interview with Sylvère Lotringer, 1977)

world’s largest ivory tower 

(via chaambler)

(via chaambler)

whiteboyfriend:

happy easter here’s a chocolate version of the cross our lord was tortured and killed on

(via tyleroakley)

aljazeeraamerica:

Opposition to clean needles for addicts: Symbolism over science?

In the midst of a debate over a controversial law calling for drug tests for any welfare recipients, public health researchers and activists in Georgia are calling for a more scientifically backed means of reaching out to and helping drug users — one that has, save for one brief period, been restricted from receiving federal funds for more than 25 years.

Georgia, along with Florida and Utah, has sought to test welfare recipients for drugs with the stated aim of saving tax dollars and getting people off drugs, but at the same time those three states combined have just one center that has scientific backing for accomplishing those goals — neither of which has been shown to be accomplished by drug testing.

Advocates say that distributing the equivalent of a few dimes a day to try and prevent a disease that may cost hundreds of thousands of dollars over a lifetime may seem a simple and smart policy, particularly when those few dimes connect recipients with health care workers they are more likely to trust and when the program is endorsed by leading health organizations. But when the few dimes represent the cost of a few syringes and the recipients are IV drug users, symbolism seems to overwhelm the scientific evidence.

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euo:

We’re not like everyone else. Too many acute angles. Too many eccentricities. We have to be very careful not to let people in or they’ll make us into freaks.”

The Aviator (2004) dir. Martin Scorsese

“On a day like today, my master William Faulkner said, “I decline to accept the end of man.” I would fall unworthy of standing in this place that was his, if I were not fully aware that the colossal tragedy he refused to recognize thirty-two years ago is now, for the first time since the beginning of humanity, nothing more than a simple scientific possibility. Faced with this awesome reality that must have seemed a mere utopia through all of human time, we, the inventors of tales, who will believe anything, feel entitled to believe that it is not yet too late to engage in the creation of the opposite utopia. A new and sweeping utopia of life, where no one will be able to decide for others how they die, where love will prove true and happiness be possible, and where the races condemned to one hundred years of solitude will have, at last and forever, a second opportunity on earth.”
— In the wake of Gabriel García Márquez’s death, wisdom from his 1982 Nobel Prize acceptance speech. Complement with Faulkner’s iconic 1950 Nobel speech on the role o the writer as a booster of the human heart, which Márquez bows to here. (via explore-blog)

euo:

The Aviator (2004) dir. Martin Scorsese

humansofnewyork:

"I probably shouldn’t have taken things so seriously."
"Like what?"
"Marriage."
"In what way?"
"I think I changed too much when I got married. I tried to fit the role too much. I came from a big Italian family, so there was a lot of emphasis on being the ‘provider.’ You know— you gotta be the man. Gotta set an example. I guess I always thought that if I kept doing drugs, drinking, and partying, my kids wouldn’t have wanted to succeed."
"So you think should have done more drugs, drank more, and partied more?"
"Yeah. Probably."

“Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could; some blunders and absurdities have crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day.”
— Ralph Waldo Emerson (via serialchillin)

(via good)